#IPledgeToCheck

QV Proudly Supports
The McGrath Foundation

QV Skincare & The McGrath Foundation

QV is proud to support the McGrath Foundation, a cause which ensures every family experiencing breast cancer has the benefit of access to a McGrath Foundation Breast Care Nurse regardless of where they live or their financial situation.

References:
  • 1Australian Government, Cancer Australia [Internet]. 2016 [cited 25 Jan 16]. Available from: http://breast-cancer-in-young-women.canceraustralia.gov.au/
  • Cancer Council Australia, Breast Cancer [Internet]. 2016 [cited 2016 June 14]. Available from: http://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/types-of-cancer/breast-cancer.html
  • Consumer breast self check habits survey, T Garage, commissioned by QV, National Sample n=226, Jan 2016. Data held on file.
  • Aztec Pharmacy Scan, Therapeutic Skincare, Value MAT to 03/01/16.

#IPledgeToCheck

Join the movement! Pledge your support to help raise awareness for breast cancer education and the importance of self checking your breasts!

1 in 8 Australian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer before they turn 852, yet only 42% of us are checking our breasts regularly 3.  Let's stand together to change this!  

How to Self Check your breasts

Look at the shape and appearance of your breast and nipples in the mirror or lying down with your hands by your sides, then raise your arms above your head. Look for a change in the shape of your breasts, any discharge, skin dimpling or redness.

Using the pads of your fingers, and keeping them together, press lightly on the superficial skin and tissue and then press more firmly to make sure you feel your deeper breast tissue. Once you have reached this deeper breast tissue, you should be able to feel your ribs. Feel for lumps, swelling or changes.

Look at the shape and appearance of your breast and nipples in the mirror or lying down with your hands by your sides, then raise your arms above your head. Look for a change in the shape of your breasts, any discharge, skin dimpling or redness.

Using the pads of your fingers, and keeping them together, press lightly on the superficial skin and tissue and then press more firmly to make sure you feel your deeper breast tissue. Once you have reached this deeper breast tissue, you should be able to feel your ribs. Feel for lumps, swelling or changes.

  • A general change in size or shape of the breast. It is normal for most women to have one breast that is larger than the other. If you notice that your breast becomes larger, or changes shape by becoming pulled in, in an area; then you should have it checked by your GP.
  • A lump or lumpiness - or a change in appearance of the breast such as dimpling of the skin or redness.
  • An area that feels different from the rest of the breast - for example this may be an area that feels firmer
  • Any pain in your breast - some pain can be quite normal for many women particularly around a period, so look out for pain that is unusual for you.
  • Any change in the shape or appearance of your nipple, such as your nipple being pulled in or development of a rash. Some women have inverted nipples that point inwards not outwards and this is normal for them. But if you don’t normally have an inverted nipple and your nipple is pulled in, this would be something to see your GP about.
  • A discharge from your nipple, particularly if it is bloody.
  • A swelling in your armpit or around your collarbone.

Report any changes or concerns to your GP. Your GP is the best person to decide if you need any further testing.

Women under 40 have dense breast tissue which makes it difficult for breast screens to accurately detect breast cancer, however, breast cancer affects women of all ages, so it’s important that all women self check their breasts regularly to pick up on any changes. Become familiar with the normal look and feel of your breasts at different times of the month. 
 Breast awareness is important because if you know how your breasts normally look and feel, you’re more likely to pick up any changes if any develop.

As well as seeing your doctor for a clinical breast examination, you should do a self check regularly.

My Breast Cancer Diagnosis

By Mim at lovefrommim.com

I discovered that I had Breast Cancer when I was in the shower one morning in November 2015. I was in the middle of weaning my second baby and my breasts were, well, deflating a little every day. Whilst washing, I found a lump. Not just a small lump either. It was the size of a grape, 2.5cms to be exact.

"Not just a small lump either. It was the size of
a grape, 2.5cms to be exact"

I immediately made an appointment with my doctor and just a few days later after scans and a biopsy, I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer. It’s a particularly aggressive and fast-growing breast cancer affecting just 15% of those diagnosed. It would be the worst one, wouldn’t it? When the shock subsided I questioned whether there was anything I could have done to find out sooner.

Had I missed something? read more >